Author of ‘Route 36’ book to visit Piqua Public Library


For the Miami Valley Sunday News



Ferguson

Ferguson


Route 36 history

U.S. Route 36 stretches over 1,400 miles from Uhrichsville, Ohio, in the foothills of the Appalachians to Estes Park, the “Gateway to the Rockies.” Before the coming of the “interstates,” it was America’s connection between the Midwest and the Rockies.

Historically, the highway closely traces the middle one-third of what was once a transcontinental highway (the Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway) that ran from New York’s Times Square through Colorado to the Gold Gate Bridge in San Francisco.

The Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway was promoted primarily by boosters from Colorado, Kansas, and midwestern states as an alternative to the Lincoln Highway and the National Old Trails Road. In particular, the “Pikes Peak” was an answer to the Lincoln Highway Association that had by-passed Colorado and the northern counties of Kansas and Missouri by routing the Lincoln through Iowa, Nebraska, and Wyoming.

In 1926, U.S. highways were numbered and the “named trails” became a thing of the past. The transcontinental named trails were broken up. U.S. Route 36 went through several east-west extensions as highways were built and improved. Its current expanse from Uhrichsville, Ohio, to Estes Park, Colorado, has been in place since 1978.

For more information about the book and the author see www.us36guidebook.com.

DENVER—Denver-based author Allan Ferguson will appear Friday, Oct. 4, 2-4 p.m., at the Piqua Public Library, 116 W High St. on the plaza in Piqua to sign and discuss his new book “Route 36: Ohio to Colorado—America’s Heartland Highway.”

Ferguson’s guidebook details the drive on Route 36 through six states, laying claim to the title “America’s Heartland Highway” and the next Great American Road Trip.

“The great thing about Route 36,” Ferguson says, “is, first, it’s right here on our doorstep. Second, it’s a largely two-lane experience far more pleasant and interesting than travel on the interstates. It’s also an historic highway of national significance.

“Unlike better-known highways like Route 66 and the Lincoln Highway,” he said, “Route 36 hasn’t been obliterated or obscured by the interstate highway system. Route 66 was de-commissioned by the federal government in 1985. In contrast, Route 36 is still there to be driven, taking us through a host of villages, towns, and small cities from Ohio to Colorado. The only large cities on the route are Indianapolis and Denver.”

Ferguson touts the “remarkable swath of American history” to be found on Route 36—icons like Annie Oakley, “Mad” Anthony Wayne, Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain, Walt Disney, General John J Pershing, “Cy” Young, and the “Unsinkable” Molly Brown. His informational slide show features sites on the highway with background history on the making of Route 36.

Ferguson’s book includes six state chapters, two chapters on transportation history, essays describing 45 towns, recommended side trips, 164 images, a bibliography, a chronology, and an index.

Ferguson is also the author of “Golf in Scotland: A Travel-Planning Guide with Profiles of 74 Great Courses.” His books are available at www.amazon.com and www.us36guidebook.com.

Ferguson
https://www.dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2019/09/web1_AFBookCrop.jpgFerguson

https://www.dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2019/09/web1_FrontCover.jpg

For the Miami Valley Sunday News

Route 36 history

U.S. Route 36 stretches over 1,400 miles from Uhrichsville, Ohio, in the foothills of the Appalachians to Estes Park, the “Gateway to the Rockies.” Before the coming of the “interstates,” it was America’s connection between the Midwest and the Rockies.

Historically, the highway closely traces the middle one-third of what was once a transcontinental highway (the Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway) that ran from New York’s Times Square through Colorado to the Gold Gate Bridge in San Francisco.

The Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway was promoted primarily by boosters from Colorado, Kansas, and midwestern states as an alternative to the Lincoln Highway and the National Old Trails Road. In particular, the “Pikes Peak” was an answer to the Lincoln Highway Association that had by-passed Colorado and the northern counties of Kansas and Missouri by routing the Lincoln through Iowa, Nebraska, and Wyoming.

In 1926, U.S. highways were numbered and the “named trails” became a thing of the past. The transcontinental named trails were broken up. U.S. Route 36 went through several east-west extensions as highways were built and improved. Its current expanse from Uhrichsville, Ohio, to Estes Park, Colorado, has been in place since 1978.

For more information about the book and the author see www.us36guidebook.com.