King headstone to be set


Former “Jane Doe” to have her name again

By Michael Ullery



Mike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, right, and Paul Sullenberger, a retired Piqua police officer who now works for Jamison & Yannucci Funeral Home, inspect initial engraving on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.

Mike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, right, and Paul Sullenberger, a retired Piqua police officer who now works for Jamison & Yannucci Funeral Home, inspect initial engraving on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.


Mike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, begins the engraving process on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.


Mike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, works with a stencil on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.


Mike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, works with a stencil on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981, as retired Piqua police officer Paul Sullenberger, center and Mike Wise look on. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.


TROY — Marcia L. Sossoman (King), known to the community as “Jane Doe” for decades, will be able to rest knowing that she now has her name back.

Once the former “Buckskin Girl” was positively identified earlier this year through a DNA match, efforts began to replace her “Jane Doe” headstone at Riverside Cemetery in Troy with one bearing her name.

The effort, spearheaded by retired Piqua police officer Paul Sullenberger, who now works at Jamison & Yannucci Funeral Home in Piqua, was funded through private donations and a stone purchased through Edwin F. Nickol Monuments in Versailles.

The stone arrived last week and engraving began on Wednesday. Meanwhile, a new cement base is being prepared at Riverside Cemetery.

The stone is scheduled to be set on Friday afternoon and a memorial service for Sossoman (King) will be held Friday at 7 p.m. The service is open to the public.

Sossoman (King) was discovered along Greenlee Road in 1981. She had been murdered and her body dumped. Although the search to identify her went nation-wide, she remained unidentified until this spring when advances in DNA databases turned up a relative match which was later turned into a positive identification.

For anyone wishing to attend Friday’s service, Sossoman (King’s) gravesite is at the northeast corner of Riverside Cemetery, off Riverside Drive.

Mike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, right, and Paul Sullenberger, a retired Piqua police officer who now works for Jamison & Yannucci Funeral Home, inspect initial engraving on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.
https://www.dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/07/web1_071818mju_marciaking2-1.jpgMike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, right, and Paul Sullenberger, a retired Piqua police officer who now works for Jamison & Yannucci Funeral Home, inspect initial engraving on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.

Mike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, begins the engraving process on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.
https://www.dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/07/web1_071818mju_marciaking3-1.jpgMike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, begins the engraving process on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.

Mike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, works with a stencil on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.
https://www.dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/07/web1_071818mju_marciaking1-1.jpgMike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, works with a stencil on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.

Mike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, works with a stencil on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981, as retired Piqua police officer Paul Sullenberger, center and Mike Wise look on. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.
https://www.dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/07/web1_071818mju_marciaking4-1.jpgMike Ullery | Daily Call Aaron Wise, of Greenville, works with a stencil on the headstone for Marcia L. Gossoman (King), aka “Buckskin Girl” who was found murdered in along Greenlee Road in Miami County in 1981, as retired Piqua police officer Paul Sullenberger, center and Mike Wise look on. Gossoman (King) was buried as Jane Doe and remained unidentified until earlier this year when advances in DNA identification made it possible to identify her.
Former “Jane Doe” to have her name again

By Michael Ullery