Finding hope at the Hope House


Successful graduate shares story

By Sam Wildow - swildow@aimmediamidwest.com



Sam Wildow | AIM Media Midwest graphic Information from the Miami County Recovery Council (MCRC) on the success rates of those admitted to the Hope House between Jan. 17 and Feb. 28

Sam Wildow | AIM Media Midwest graphic Information from the Miami County Recovery Council (MCRC) on the success rates of those admitted to the Hope House between Jan. 17 and Feb. 28


ABOUT THIS SERIES

The Piqua Daily Call continues its occasional series, “Addicted & Dying: The opioid epidemic in Ohio,” to offer a look at how opiates affect us locally.

Today: Finding hope at the Hope House

Saturday: Narcan: 40 cents saves a life

MIAMI COUNTY — The Miami County Recovery Council’s Hope House is showing that life after addiction is possible, as their program is seeing a success rate of just over 50 percent, with one successful graduate of the program saying that the Hope House saved his life.

“This was the best decision of my life,” Chris Depinet said. “It saved my life.”

The Hope House opened in January 2017 as a social detox facility for men, made possible by local organizations and foundation grants. The goal is a structured, safe withdrawal from opiates with the assistance of nurses and peer recovery staff 24 hours every day. The program has since expanded to the second floor to house women in need of withdrawal management services.

Depinet used heroin for about six years before he decided to seek treatment through MCRC and the Hope House.

“The way things were going, it was pretty bad,” Depinet said. “I got myself into a lot of trouble from it (heroin).”

Depinet is now a team leader at Joshua Recovery Ministries and was the first person to move into the Joshua Recovery Ministries’ Troy location.

Depinet survived an overdose, after which the Hope House helped him get on the road to recovery.

“It was a lot better than what I expected,” Depinet said about the Hope House. “It felt like I was on vacation.”

Social Detox Coordinator Megan Calicoat helps oversee the transition for clients of Hope House, which includes a stay of approximately seven to 14 days at the facility.

“My role is to transition the clients coming in, whether it be off the street, jail, any other inpatient facility to the Miami County Recovery Council,” Calicoat said. “I follow them through the process as far as getting them with a nurse for their assessment and then also them getting over actually to the Hope House. Then after the Hope House, it’s to follow through going from inpatient detox to outpatient treatment, intensive outpatient here.”

Calicoat is also a nurse and completes assessments on the clients and administers medications. The program is voluntary and uses medication-assisted treatment to help clients get through the detox process.

“I kind of follow them through from when they come in to when they leave and sometimes past when they are discharged,” Calicoat said.

The Hope House can also provide help in getting clients into a different living situation than the one they came from prior to entering the facility, which can include other inpatient options if necessary. Calicoat said that this was to help give clients a better chance of staying clean.

Between Jan. 12, 2017, and Feb. 28, of this year, the Hope House admitted 70 people, including 51 men and 19 women. The facility has seen 36 successful graduates during that time — including 28 men and eight women — giving them a 51 percent success rate.

The facility had one administrative discharge, and 23 people left the facility against staff advice. The total bed days during that period was 550 days. The average length of stay for clients was 7.9 days.

Calicoat said that the transition that people go through between 10-14 days after they go through the detox process is amazing to watch due to the transformations that people undergo while becoming healthier and fighting their addictions.

“It’s almost like they come back to life,” Calicoat said.

Depinet noted how the staff at the Hope House and MCRC understood where he was coming from and helped him.

“They know the addiction part,” Depinet said. “I can trust them. They just get it.”

Depinet encouraged those struggling with addiction to seek help, telling others that they don’t have to live their lives using drugs.

“If I could tell anybody to go there, I would,” Depinet said. “I’ve lived that way. Call MCRC. Schedule, get into detox. There’s nothing out there, not when you’re using.”

Sam Wildow | AIM Media Midwest graphic Information from the Miami County Recovery Council (MCRC) on the success rates of those admitted to the Hope House between Jan. 17 and Feb. 28
https://www.dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/04/web1_MCRC-Hope-House-graphic-2-CMYK.jpgSam Wildow | AIM Media Midwest graphic Information from the Miami County Recovery Council (MCRC) on the success rates of those admitted to the Hope House between Jan. 17 and Feb. 28
Successful graduate shares story

By Sam Wildow

swildow@aimmediamidwest.com

ABOUT THIS SERIES

The Piqua Daily Call continues its occasional series, “Addicted & Dying: The opioid epidemic in Ohio,” to offer a look at how opiates affect us locally.

Today: Finding hope at the Hope House

Saturday: Narcan: 40 cents saves a life

Reach Sam Wildow at swildow@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Sam Wildow at swildow@aimmediamidwest.com