Students sharpen their skills


Summer program helps students improve

By Amy Barger - abarger@aimmedianetwork.com



Dustin Kerce, who will be in seventh grade in the fall, uses a peg arc tool to practice eye coordination by following a peg with his dominant eye as it is moved along the arc. Kerce participated in one of the programs that was offered this summer at Nicholas School that helps students with neurological or developmental issues stay sharp during summer break.


Provided photo

PIQUA — The Nicholas School, an extension of the Rehabilitation Center for Neurological Development in Piqua, has summer programs that have been helping special needs students stay sharp while on summer break from school, and the results have been positive.

The programs offered at the school are Summer Readiness (ages 4-6), Summer Boost-Up (grades 1-8), and Extended Day Program (any age). All programs work with students on academics, vision and motor skills, auditory processing, and activities that help with neurological development.

“We had a lot of successful results, whether it is academically or neurologically, we definitely seen a lot of difference with our kids in that six-week time,” Principal Holly Felver said. Some of those improvements included fine motor improvement, increase in eye contact, better letter/number recognition, and improvement in speech and behavior.

Students engage in activities that work the left and right side of the brain as well as practicing physical movement such as eye coordination. A peg arc is a tool used that helps to enhance quick eye movement by moving a peg along the arc and the student follows that peg with their eyes.

“I think a lot of (the program) is helping (students) academically in the classroom, and helps them to be more prepared for the school year and deal with their communication issues,” Felver said.

The six-week program operated for three hours a day and four days a week, with teachers interacting with students one-on-one to find out what needed improvement in the child. As opposed to a normal classroom of 20 or more, teachers in the program work with an average of five students during their session, allowing more attention to be spent on each student.

“We always feel the summer program is truly beneficial,” Felver said. “It’s neat to see the changes that happen in a six-week time frame, it’s heartwarming.”

Children with learning disabilities such as ADD/ADHD, autism, Tourette’s, Down Syndrome, and other effects of brain injury are served at the Nicholas School. The school provides an environment that allows these students to reach their maximum potential physically and academically.

Dustin Kerce, who will be in seventh grade in the fall, uses a peg arc tool to practice eye coordination by following a peg with his dominant eye as it is moved along the arc. Kerce participated in one of the programs that was offered this summer at Nicholas School that helps students with neurological or developmental issues stay sharp during summer break.
http://www.dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2015/07/web1_NicholasSchool1.jpgDustin Kerce, who will be in seventh grade in the fall, uses a peg arc tool to practice eye coordination by following a peg with his dominant eye as it is moved along the arc. Kerce participated in one of the programs that was offered this summer at Nicholas School that helps students with neurological or developmental issues stay sharp during summer break. Provided photo
Summer program helps students improve

By Amy Barger

abarger@aimmedianetwork.com

Reach Amy Barger at (937) 451-3340 or on Twitter @TheDailyCall.

Reach Amy Barger at (937) 451-3340 or on Twitter @TheDailyCall.